How well was it performed?

The Razer Kraken is now $50 off on a green gaming headset, making it one of the finest holiday tech discounts around. Even though the sound quality was previously good for the price, now it’s the even greater value. It’s still only $55 for the Alienware Kraken Tournament Edition, of the kind that we highly recommend if you have the additional cash to burn.

Razer’s RGB-heavy designs:

Nevertheless, you feel about Razer’s Color image versions of green gaming headsets; there is no questioning that the Kraken is tasteful for its price range. It has a simple design with a colored plastic strip that attaches to two oval earcups. The lack of aluminum and actual leather in the device’s layout makes it very light, measuring in at little over 320g, and that also leaves it feeling brittle and fragile than other options.

Material of green gaming headset:

Each earcup has a metal frame that connects to the headband’s internal components. I feel more secure with the additional solidity, and all of the fasteners around each piece are securely secured. An integrated retractable microphone is placed neatly into the headset’s left earcup, accommodating the 3.5mm cable. If you want additional features, the Tournament Edition is the way to go.

Color:

The Kraken’s green color makes a strong visual statement while also giving the impression that the headset is less well-built than it appears. On the other hand, the black color scheme is much more subdued, if not particularly exciting. What about the pink quartz Kraken? Perfection. Except if you’re a massive fan of pink, none of these flavors are trendy.

Audio:

The Kraken excels at gaming, and we give it a shot in that regard. Despite being intended for the PC, we tested the Tournament Updated version across all current gaming platforms to see how it fared. The Kraken sounded great in Assassin’s Creed Odyssey, one of our all-time favorite games to test on the system. When A wave slams Austria, this headgear does its job admirably.

Foam padding around the ears:

It contains bass controls game/chat balancing, and you can turn off the THX Spatial audio for non-gaming use. It’s a shame the Kraken doesn’t have any of these things. A nice touch is the inclusion of extra cushioning to the headband and soft foam around the ears. The headset works perfectly in all other respects. As a result of its thick padding, persons with more miniature helmets may be afraid that it won’t fit as snuggly as they prefer.

Treble and upper ranges:

There are numbering studs on the headband’s edge that make it easy to modify our fit. And, in combat, the heavy reliance on bass makes every thud and impact feel substantial and complete. The treble and upper ranges aren’t as full and rich as they could be on the Kraken. When you’re standing still and listening to the ambient world, you’ll notice the same lack of clarity that other, more expensive headsets have.

How well was it performed?

We put the Kraken to the test in Apex Legends in terms of multiplayer and were pleasantly surprised by how well it performed. Due to their gaming focus, these cans have an excellent bass sound and a good sense of imaging for hearing massive explosions both close and far away.

Cost of green gaming headset:

When comparing the Kraken to headsets costing twice as much, it’s not fair. I was blown away by the overall sound system here for the price. While testing the Samsung Q9FN, we discovered multiple incidents where it missed subtle auditory cues, such as the low crackling of the fire, which was a real bummer.

Green gaming headset for a single player:

Because of its much flatter sound spectrum, the Kraken does an excellent job blending dialogue with background noise in movies like Executioner’s Creed. There is also a good amount of in-game music; on the other hand, the higher-pitched guitar numbers on the Odyssey soundtrack suffer from a lack of clarity. As a result, like a headset for a single player, it’s adequate – but not superior to the speakers on a high-end television.

Specifications and use cases:

The Poseidon is a headset for gaming that doesn’t have any frills. The only extras are a retractable microphone and in-line volume control. To begin, turn on the microphone. When it’s not in use, it’s easily slipped away thanks to its retractable and incredibly durable design. As long as you have the mic aligned correctly, the audio is obvious, and it’s a vast improvement over the earlier Kraken Pro V2 mic.

Long-term gaming comfort:

The Razer Kraken’s Bauxite aluminum chassis is lightweight, flexible, and incredibly durable. You can hear even during long gaming marathons because of the cooling-gel cushions that keep your ears cool. They also increase noise rejection.

With the advancement of the venerable gaming headset:

The Razer Kraken has been redesigned for 2018. When gaming gets hot, you’ll appreciate the upgraded cardioid microphone’s robust sound and clarity, and you’ll hear on the battlefield. Stay cool with the cooling-gel function and heat-transfer fabric in the new and enhanced Kraken design in Green while playing comfortably. The company has enhanced this cult classic gaming headset from Razer for the gaming community to improve the audio quality.

Review on green gaming headset:

As of this writing, Razer has released a new batch of color-refreshed items: this Kraken gaming headset in pure green color. The Seiren, the Blackwidow, and a new Razer Blade gaming laptop are part of Razers Mercury gaming keyboard and mouse lineup. It’s called the Mercury range from Razer, and it’s a technologically advanced one indeed.

Conclusion:

The Kraken is an excellent green gaming headset for games like shooting and action that contain a lot of noise and fury, thanks to its updated and improved capabilities. It’s great for bass, but the rest of the audio is mediocre at best. That said, for the price and simplicity of the design, it still performs admirably. However, while Kraken’s design is simple and elegant in spots, the color scheme and materials used to make it are questionable.

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